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People suffering from conditions of chronic pain or mental illness would rather consume cannabis than take their prescribed opioid medications. That’s according to a new study conducted by researchers with the University of Victory and the University of British Colombia.pills

According to the study’s co-author, this research is the first of its kind to follow people who had access to both medical marijuana and prescription pharmaceuticals, such as opioids, benzodiazepines and anti-depressants. The  study followed more than 250 people who were prescribed medication for formally diagnosed conditions ranging from chronic pain to gastrointestinal issues to mental health. In all, about 63 percent of respondents indicated they preferred to use cannabis over the prescriptions to treat chronic pain, depression and other conditions.

So why would people prefer pot? According to the study authors, it may have a lot to do with the reduction in side effects, as well as the overall feeling that marijuana is a lot safer than many prescription drugs.  Continue reading

For the first time in global history, gym members can get lit while lifting. workout

It’s happening at a new gym in San Francisco, founded by a former professional football star who has been a staunch advocate for marijuana use. Ricky Williams, a former running back who scored the Heisman Trophy in college and played in the National Football League for the Saints, Ravens and Dolphins, teamed up with snowboard company executive Jim McAlpine. The company, Power Plant Fitness, allows members to smoke marijuana before or after working out, and also has edibles and topical gels for those who want to avoid actual smoke. It will officially open in May.

Many users say marijuana helps them to focus during or relax after workout sessions. The goal, according to the company’s website, is to promote “optimal states of wellness and peak performance.” As Alpine told Outside magazine last year, cannabis brings you in the “eye of the tiger mode.”  Continue reading

Recent statements by new U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions regarding the recreational marijuana industry have many on edge, concerned for a return to the days of constant federal raids and crackdowns on businesses and individuals abiding state cannabis law. cannabis

In response to this, a number of Sessions’ fellow Republicans – including Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman – are urging Sessions to reconsider.

Specifically, Coffman told The Denver Post she extended an invitation to Sessions to come to Colorado and see how the state has managed and regulated its recreational marijuana industry. Coffman’s invitation was reportedly extended in a meeting with some of Session’s top staffers in Washington D.C. Coffman noted that Colorado is a good place for Sessions to start any inquiry on the matter, as Colorado is the state with the longest history of recreational marijuana in the country.  Continue reading

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is no fan of marijuana. But would he really effect policy that would upend a multi-billion dollar industry that weakens cartels, provides relief for the ailing and dying and helps hundreds of thousands of people avoid unnecessary jail time and criminal penalties? arrest

If one of his recent speeches is any indication, the answer is likely: Absolutely.

The speech took place in Virginia at a summit on violent crime. In part of his message, he called marijuana use a “life-wrecking dependency” that could be considered only slightly less terrible than heroin.  Continue reading

A funeral director licensed to work in New Jersey has filed an employment lawsuit, alleging he was fired for her personal use of marijuana to help treat symptoms of cancer. smoke

According to NJ.com, the 39-year-old professional wrote in his complaint that he’d been prescribed medicinal marijuana after being diagnosed with cancer approximately two years ago. Two years before that, in 2013, he was hired to work as a funeral director, where he logged approximately 30 hours each week. By all accounts, he did the job well and had good reviews for customer satisfaction. But then, in the spring of 2015, his physician found a tumor on his spine. They removed it. Then, they found another one. That one was in too dangerous a location to be surgically removed. Other forms of treatment, including chemotherapy and radiation were ordered. To help ease some of those symptoms, including nausea and loss of appetite, doctors prescribed patient moderate doses of marijuana.

Plaintiff insists he never used the drug during working hours, using the substance only in the evenings. Further, he insists he was never high at work. However, one day in May 2016, plaintiff was on-the-job, driving his vehicle when he was involved in car accident. At the hospital emergency room, he revealed that he had a prescription for medical marijuana and he tested positive for the drug. However, he insisted he was not under the influence of the drug at the time of the collision. Continue reading

In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind lawsuit, the sons of a woman killed by her husband, allegedly after he consumed marijuana-laced taffy, are suing the maker of that candy, as well as the retailer who sold it to the man. The victim’s sons are alleging wrongful death. Specifically, the sons allege the clerk at the store failed to warn the husband/ buyer of the fact that if he consumed too much, it could trigger paranoia, psychosis and hallucinations. candy

It’s going to be something of an uphill battle for the plaintiffs, though, because they are going to be tasked with proving marijuana was the cause of this violent episode, even though violence is almost never associated with marijuana use.

The 44-year-old victim died in April 2014 after her husband shot her in the head. This was after he consumed several bites of an orange ginger taffy that contained marijuana. He’d reportedly purchased the candy at a retailer on South Colorado Boulevard in Denver. After being informed that the buyer was not an experienced user, the store clerk reportedly did tell him not to take too large of a dose, but it’s not exactly clear if he defined how much was too much. The whole taffy candy contained 100 milligrams of THC. State regulators consider this 10 times the normal dosage. The man didn’t eat the entire candy, but it’s not clear how much he consumed. Drug tests performed after the murder indicated he had a THC concentration of 2.3 nanograms per milliliter, which is less than half of what is considered by lawmakers in that state to constitute impairment by a driver. Still, the drug isn’t processed in the same way as, say, alcohol, so it’s not clear whether that is in fact an accurate determination of his level of impairment, particularly given that he was not a regular user. Continue reading

The city of Fife in Washington state has a formal ban on marijuana sales – both recreational and medicinal – despite a statewide law that allows both types of businesses. marijuana

But now, as The News Tribune has reported, one man is determined to open a shop there anyway – making it one of two marijuana retail operations that will be legally up-and-running in city limits. The reason this is possible, as the reporter explained, is because the first location is run by the Puyallup Tribe. The Native American group’s shop, which opened in what used to be a cigar bar, is situated on tribal land and therefore isn’t bound by city rules.

The second store is slated to open in a former drug store. It’s within walking distance of the tribal shop. That location is within the boundaries of the city’s authority, but the shop will be allowed in spite of the ban following an out-of-court settlement reached late last year by the owner and the city in which the owner won an exemption against the ban.  Continue reading

State law in California now says that if you are over the age of 21, you have the right to grow up to six cannabis plans for your own personal use. The law also extends to cities and/ or counties the right to impose reasonable regulation on this homegrown marijuana provision. marijuana

These two rules were both part of Proposition 64, the state’s new legalized marijuana law. However, they conflict with each other and have become something of a battleground in some cities. In the three months since the law took effect, a number of cities home implemented rules for residential growing of the plant. But these rules are testing the boundaries of what may be deemed “reasonable” in terms of regulations.

Cities are citing concerns about safety in their provisions that prohibit marijuana gardens outdoors. Others require costly permits if people want to grow the plant. There are even a few cities that have outright banned the practice.  Continue reading

Bong manufacturing has come a long way from the days of the homemade versions, usually involving a used, two-liter bottle. There were always companies that produced higher-end pipes and bongs, but it was always something of an underground scene and very much a niche market. bong

Today, people purchase certain pipes to impress. Although technically both marijuana and the tools used to smoke are outlawed by federal statute, there are still companies carving out a market for themselves. In fact, they can be much sought-after status symbols, with the higher-end models selling for anywhere from $1,000 all the way up to $4,000. Some are even diamond-studded, and certain brands pride themselves on being top-of-the-line.

Despite the illegality under federal law, one manufacturer is availing itself of the remedy of federal court, where it has filed a complaint to protect both its brand and its sales from alleged counterfeit bong makers.  Continue reading

Marijuana advocates are suing the county over its voter-approved tax on marijuana, arguing the results are not legitimate. Specifically, the group is arguing that Measure AI proposed a tax that amounted to a special tax, not a general tax. For this reason, the measure required not just a simple majority, but a two-thirds majority approval.vote

When the measure passed by voters in November, it amounted to a tax of between 2.5 percent and 10 percent on the gross receipts of cannabis cultivators. It also imposed on all other marijuana businesses a flat-rate tax of $2,500 annually.

An advisory that was attached to this measure indicated that voters wished to have this money spent on county services. Specifically, this would include not just code enforcement on marijuana businesses, but also emergency medical services, fire and police services, repairs of roads and mental health services. This was a non-binding agreement, though, and county leaders technically can spend the funds on whatever they wish.  Continue reading