Articles Tagged with California marijuana lawyer

Retail stores selling recreational marijuana in California are likely to be open by January 1st, according to the Bureau of Cannabis Control in California. Already, the plant and its derivatives are available for recreational sales in five other states, but California is slated to be the biggest market in the country, poised for massive production for its huge population. Some economists speculate it will “dramatically” alter the landscape of the marijuana industry in the U.S. marijuana lawyer

New regulation are going to be issued in November. These regulations will include oversight on usage of water (reduction of waste water, drip irrigation, etc.). Licensing and background checks of owners and operators, as well as education and safety training for consumers is also in the works.

For the most part, recreational sales will be a welcome extension to marijuana dispensaries that have existed for years, some since California’s Proposition 215, which legalized the drug for medicinal uses with the Compassionate Use Act of 1996.

While voters in 26 states plus the District of Columbia have given the green light to laws that legalize marijuana in some form, questions still remain about the legality of certain cannabis advertising campaigns.cannabis Lawyer Riverside

Recently, the Los Angeles Times reported a new venue for advertising recently opened, though it’s not heavily-utilized at this point, and it’s unclear whether it will amount to a sizable business opportunity. U.S.-based air carrier Allegiant Air, headquartered in Las Vegas, NV, has become the first to agree to allow advertising from a marijuana dispensary.

It’s found on the airline’s in-flight magazine, Sunseeker, which ran an advertisement for a marijuana dispensary that produces THC-laden cookies and candies, sold just a few blocks from the strip in Las Vegas. A full view of the kitchen is displayed in bright, colorful pictures on the in-flight magazine. Continue reading

A U.S. Senate panel with considerable power in the federal government is pressing federal agencies to wade into the marijuana industries in ways that some might find surprising. Specifically, there is a request that federal safety testing be conducted on products made by marijuana dispensaries in states where the drug has been legalized. Such standardized marijuana testing could help customers have confidence that their products are safe. marijuana research attorney

Lack of information on the purity and potency of marijuana products distributed to U.S. consumers is of major concern, according to the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee. That’s why its members are asking that federal agencies work together to develop a standard, national testing program for Schedule I products made from marijuana.

The appropriations committee’s recent report instructed qualified scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse as well as those working with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to start work on samples of marijuana in order to give the federal government better data that could be used to provide better policy solutions to help protect consumers.  Continue reading

Recreational sales of marijuana in California will be legal by next year, yet most financial institutions refuse to allow marijuana companies to open up business accounts. Entrepreneurs remain uncertain of how to manage a legitimate business when they’ve got mountains of cash to manage. They are asking the state and/ or municipalities to get involved. Specifically: Start a public bank that would cater specifically to cannabis companies. marijuana business attorney

Some leaders and candidates are beginning to warm to the idea, which would involve a government-owned institution with the authority to take deposits, issue loans and be on board to work with business that derive profit from marijuana – even though it’s a Schedule I narcotic.

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsome, who is also vying for the governorship, has publicly backed the foundation of a government bank and held discussions with leading marijuana industry insiders. Recently, the L.A. City Council President called for an analysis into a city-owned bank that would be able to serve marijuana businesses.

Black market sales of marijuana thrived under a system that totally outlawed the drug. For decades, illicit sales lined the pockets of violent drug cartels and gangs. Legalizing marijuana, as California did with Prop. 64, would effectively quash this problem, or so it was believed. After all, when marijuana is sold in highly-regulated stores, it gives the government more control, it gives taxpayers a cut and it provides safe access for patients and users. However, recent analysis shows black market sales may not be completely eliminated. marijuana license

The San Francisco Chronicle looked at this issue in weighing the makeup of the black market.

First, there is the fact the California grows more marijuana than is consumed by residents. Prop. 64 did nothing to effect the laws in other states, but interstate borders aren’t always policed to the point every person crossing from one state to the next with marijuana would be caught. Secondly, the law did not give a rubber stamp to all growers or sellers of marijuana. Sellers have to be licensed by a state agency, and they must comply with a long series of rules that detail everything from plant testing to packaging labels to tracking.  Continue reading

Proponents of the failed “War on Drugs” have long characterized marijuana as a “gateway” drug, meaning it opens the doors to use of heavier, more dangerous narcotics.marijuana lawyer

But now, a new drug rehabilitation center in Los Angeles is touting cannabis as an “exit” drug – a way out of the prison of addiction. As Leafly reports, the center, called High Sobriety, does not focus on complete and total abstinence of all substances (the hard-line approach advocated by groups like Narcotics Anonymous and other 12-step model programs). Instead, participants are encouraged to rely on marijuana as a means to cope with the difficulties of withdrawals and more. Although many treatment models staunchly discourage replacing one drug for another, that’s exactly what facilitators hope to do here. Marijuana, they say, is much less threatening than the harder drugs like heroin, cocaine and prescription narcotics for which the cannabis serves as a substitute.

The facility and its treatment model are quite new, but there is a high likelihood we’ll see more of these centers crop up if there are continued success stories. Although medicinal marijuana has been available in California for those with certain debilitating medical conditions since the 1990s, those in the treatment center won’t need a prescription, so long as they are over 21, thanks to the passage of Prop. 64 last year. Continue reading

Former senator and current Attorney General, Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III has not made any efforts to hide the fact that he thinks marijuana has no valid medical use and is not something “good people” would use.

LA Medical Marijuana LawyerHowever, his hands are currently tied in prosecuting those who grow, distribute, dispense, and possess for personal use any medical marijuana.  The reason his hands are tied is because the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment was passed with bipartisan support in Congress and prohibits the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) from spending taxpayer dollars to prosecute medical marijuana in states where medical marijuana is legal.  Continue reading

According to a recent news report from The Sacramento Bee, the vineyards in California’s wine country are starting to look like cannabis farms. Many are starting to enter the marijuana business.

LA Cannabis Lawyer All of these changes have been spurred on by the recent legalization of recreational use of marijuana in our state. Farmers who already have land and expertise in growing a high value crop (specialty wine grapes) are realizing that with some education in cannabis crops, they can make a lot more money cultivating marijuana. Continue reading

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is no fan of marijuana. But would he really effect policy that would upend a multi-billion dollar industry that weakens cartels, provides relief for the ailing and dying and helps hundreds of thousands of people avoid unnecessary jail time and criminal penalties? arrest

If one of his recent speeches is any indication, the answer is likely: Absolutely.

The speech took place in Virginia at a summit on violent crime. In part of his message, he called marijuana use a “life-wrecking dependency” that could be considered only slightly less terrible than heroin.  Continue reading

State law in California now says that if you are over the age of 21, you have the right to grow up to six cannabis plans for your own personal use. The law also extends to cities and/ or counties the right to impose reasonable regulation on this homegrown marijuana provision. marijuana

These two rules were both part of Proposition 64, the state’s new legalized marijuana law. However, they conflict with each other and have become something of a battleground in some cities. In the three months since the law took effect, a number of cities home implemented rules for residential growing of the plant. But these rules are testing the boundaries of what may be deemed “reasonable” in terms of regulations.

Cities are citing concerns about safety in their provisions that prohibit marijuana gardens outdoors. Others require costly permits if people want to grow the plant. There are even a few cities that have outright banned the practice.  Continue reading