Articles Tagged with Marijuana DUI

In California, vaping or smoking marijuana in public is not lawful. You’d be forgiven, however, if you didn’t realize that walking on any random strip in Southern California. Lighting up almost everywhere has become practically ubiquitous. Homeowners, renters and businesses have had their share of complaints. Some businesses have even posted explicit signage making it clear: No smoking allowed. Nonetheless, the smell wafts on near every corner. marijuana lawyer

Los Angeles marijuana lawyers know there has been an uptick among local law enforcement citations for smoking in public areas, particularly those nearby to schools, parks, restaurants, shops and in cars or boats. (No, you cannot light up in a car, even if you’re a passenger.) Police say many individuals aren’t familiar with this provision of the law, and even visitors who have come to the state on vacation end up leaving – well, not on probation, but with wallets $100 lighter. That’s the fine for public marijuana smoking in California.

Common areas in apartments and even balconies are forbidden spots for outdoor pot smoking, though that usually goes unchecked unless your neighbors complain. This restriction has become particularly burdensome for those who use the drug as medicine.  Continue reading

Researchers in Colorado are exploring the ways in which “dabbing” – a form of rapid consumption of cannabis concentrates by vaporizing – can impair one’s ability to drive, and they’re doing it with iPods. marijuana lawyer

A group of researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder are teaming up with a researcher from Colorado State University to explore this highly potent method of using marijuana. CSU notes this study is a “first-of-its-kind,” and the hope is to eventually prevent instances of driving under the influence that endangers lives.

Our L.A. marijuana defense attorneys recognize that our state, like Colorado, has a vested interest in enforcing anti-impairment laws for motorists. After all, we know marijuana has the ability to impair one’s driving abilities and we know impaired drivers have slower reaction times and lowered inhibitions that can endanger passengers and other motorists. However, the problem specifically when it comes to marijuana impairment behind the wheel is that the determination is subjective.  Continue reading

Marijuana has created a confusing legal vortex for the enforcement of impaired driving laws. In contrast to alcohol, there is no set blood level at which a driver is legally impaired by marijuana. California’s new recreational marijuana law also makes it more difficult for an officer to determine whether a driver has exceeded the allowable limit of marijuana for personal use. Finally, federal law makes the transportation of any amount of marijuana a federal crime. While the Department of Justice has not, historically, expended funds for the prosecution of defendants who were following state law, this is a policy choice which is subject to change with each new administration. cannabis DUI lawyers

The Preliminary Determinations in a DUI Investigation

Before determining if a driver is impaired, law enforcement officers must first determine whether the driver has a legal right to possess or consume marijuana at all. Prior to November 9, 2016, California drivers could only do so by the possession of a valid medical marijuana card. Now – with the legalization of recreational marijuana – any person in California may possess up to one ounce of marijuana or six plants. An officer who pulls over a California driver on suspicion of DUI must therefore first determine: (a) if there is marijuana in the vehicle, and (b) whether it exceeds the legal limit.

While Californians may have a right to possess marijuana, it is still illegal to drive with an open container of marijuana in the vehicle. According to the Sacramento Bee, this applies to any receptacles or marijuana products that are open, have previously been opened, or have a broken seal. Continue reading

Marijuana is legal in California, but lawmakers are looking to ban the so-called “country cruise.” Specifically, state legislators have proposed in Senate Bill 65 banning the act of smoking marijuana while operating a motor vehicle. driving

This might seem like common sense – or perhaps already covered under existing impaired driving laws – but legislators insist the law will close a gaping loophole left by Proposition 64, the ballot measure California voters approved in November that legalized marijuana for recreational use. Prop. 64 does ban the presence of an open container of marijuana in a vehicle, but it doesn’t say anything about using marijuana while driving.

The measure was proposed by two Democractic lawmakers, Assemblyman Evan Low and Senator Jerry Hill.  Continue reading