Articles Tagged with marijuana lawyer

Most people know that 420 holds special meaning among stoners. What few seem to know, however, is just how April 20th became so revered among the reefer-loving throngs. smoke

Different strands of the story have cropped up in recent years. Some will tell you it’s tea time in Holland. Others think it has something to do with the number of active chemicals in the drug. Others cite a tune by Bob Dylan. Maybe it’s the California criminal code to punish marijuana possession? (It’s not.) Some think it’s totally arbitrary.

According to CNN, the most credible theory begins with a secret code among a group of high school friends at San Rafael High School in Marin County, California. They called themselves, “the Waldos.” Almost every school day at 4:20 p.m., they would meet up and smoke out.  Continue reading

State lawmakers in Colorado are pressing forward with a proposal that would limit marijuana cultivation on residential properties, capping the maximum number of plants at 12. marijuana

House committee members approved the measure 11-2 recently. If passed, this measure would reverse the country’s most generous allowance on in-home cannabis cultivation.

As it stands currently, Colorado’s recreational marijuana law allows medical marijuana patients to grow a maximum of 99 plants – way in excess of what other states allow. State law also gives a green light for recreational marijuana users to combine their six allotted marijuana plants into large co-ops. The result, lawmakers say, is that there are huge greenhouses where marijuana is grown, but neither tracked nor taxed.  Continue reading

Recreational marijuana seemed like an all-but-certain prospect just a few months ago. Certainly in California, the results of the November election helped to solidify the where its future would lie in The Golden State. But that same day came the unexpected election of Donald J. Trump, which in turn has meant uncertainty for the future of legal marijuana.questionmark

We do know the American public overwhelmingly supports legalizing recreational marijuana, and many lawmakers are eyeing it as a way to rake in millions of dollars in taxes that can be used for the greater good. As of today, we have a total of eight states – including California – that have legalized cannabis for recreational use. There was hope when Trump took office that, at the very least, Obama’s “hands-off” policy would continue, given Trump’s stated support for state’s rights. But then, he appointed Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) to the post of U.S. Attorney General. Sessions has long been a vocal critic of recreational marijuana. On top of that, some in the Trump administration have warned that legal recreational marijuana could be the target of federal enforcement action, as the drug still remains outlawed under federal statutes.

All of this has left us with a great deal of uncertainty moving forward. It’s really not clear to marijuana businesses or even our marijuana lawyers what move the federal government and legislators may take next. While Republicans tend to be less favorable toward recreational marijuana on the whole, the issue is not split solely down party lines and a lot of Republicans support it.  Continue reading

There is a worldwide trend toward liberalization and increasing consumption of marijuana. One of the only real harmful side effects of the drug (not withstanding use by motorists) is the potential for transient symptoms of psychosis, particularly among novice users. crazy run

You may recall the 2015 “American Sniper” trial wherein prosecutors successfully countered a claim by the defendant who fatally shot the sniper and then alleged he suffered from schizophrenia. Prosecutors opined he was simply high. Also in 2015, there was the case of a 49-year-old Denver man accused of killing his wife after eating marijuana-infused candy he had just purchased legally at a marijuana dispensary. Defense attorneys have argued defendant was so high, he did not intend to kill his wife. Then there was a death of a college student who jumped to his death after reportedly eating a potent marijuana cookie.

In each case, questions have arisen regarding the potency of these drugs. In the wake of this, researchers with King College’s London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience are urging regulators to fund scientific studies that will more accurately show how we can make marijuana safer. Continue reading

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is no fan of marijuana. But would he really effect policy that would upend a multi-billion dollar industry that weakens cartels, provides relief for the ailing and dying and helps hundreds of thousands of people avoid unnecessary jail time and criminal penalties? arrest

If one of his recent speeches is any indication, the answer is likely: Absolutely.

The speech took place in Virginia at a summit on violent crime. In part of his message, he called marijuana use a “life-wrecking dependency” that could be considered only slightly less terrible than heroin.  Continue reading

A funeral director licensed to work in New Jersey has filed an employment lawsuit, alleging he was fired for her personal use of marijuana to help treat symptoms of cancer. smoke

According to NJ.com, the 39-year-old professional wrote in his complaint that he’d been prescribed medicinal marijuana after being diagnosed with cancer approximately two years ago. Two years before that, in 2013, he was hired to work as a funeral director, where he logged approximately 30 hours each week. By all accounts, he did the job well and had good reviews for customer satisfaction. But then, in the spring of 2015, his physician found a tumor on his spine. They removed it. Then, they found another one. That one was in too dangerous a location to be surgically removed. Other forms of treatment, including chemotherapy and radiation were ordered. To help ease some of those symptoms, including nausea and loss of appetite, doctors prescribed patient moderate doses of marijuana.

Plaintiff insists he never used the drug during working hours, using the substance only in the evenings. Further, he insists he was never high at work. However, one day in May 2016, plaintiff was on-the-job, driving his vehicle when he was involved in car accident. At the hospital emergency room, he revealed that he had a prescription for medical marijuana and he tested positive for the drug. However, he insisted he was not under the influence of the drug at the time of the collision. Continue reading

In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind lawsuit, the sons of a woman killed by her husband, allegedly after he consumed marijuana-laced taffy, are suing the maker of that candy, as well as the retailer who sold it to the man. The victim’s sons are alleging wrongful death. Specifically, the sons allege the clerk at the store failed to warn the husband/ buyer of the fact that if he consumed too much, it could trigger paranoia, psychosis and hallucinations. candy

It’s going to be something of an uphill battle for the plaintiffs, though, because they are going to be tasked with proving marijuana was the cause of this violent episode, even though violence is almost never associated with marijuana use.

The 44-year-old victim died in April 2014 after her husband shot her in the head. This was after he consumed several bites of an orange ginger taffy that contained marijuana. He’d reportedly purchased the candy at a retailer on South Colorado Boulevard in Denver. After being informed that the buyer was not an experienced user, the store clerk reportedly did tell him not to take too large of a dose, but it’s not exactly clear if he defined how much was too much. The whole taffy candy contained 100 milligrams of THC. State regulators consider this 10 times the normal dosage. The man didn’t eat the entire candy, but it’s not clear how much he consumed. Drug tests performed after the murder indicated he had a THC concentration of 2.3 nanograms per milliliter, which is less than half of what is considered by lawmakers in that state to constitute impairment by a driver. Still, the drug isn’t processed in the same way as, say, alcohol, so it’s not clear whether that is in fact an accurate determination of his level of impairment, particularly given that he was not a regular user. Continue reading

Weddings are often about tradition. There is the dress and the vows and the dance and the tossing of the bouquet. But it appears a growing number of betrothed couples in states where recreational marijuana is now legal are forging a new tradition: Weed at the wedding. boquet

There are a lot of different ways couples are incorporating this.

For some, as Fox News noted, it involves “the first toke,” using a “unit bowl” that represents the blending of their two budding lives together – similar to what we see with the older traditions of the “unity candle’ or the “sand ceremony.” In other cases, as CNBC reports, there is at least one florist in Denver who at her “Buds & Blossoms” shop specializes solely on marijuana-infused weddings. She affixes floral wedding bouquets and centerpieces with buds of cannabis tucked among the hydrangeas and roses. And there are other couples who are inviting their guests to imbibe with “cannabis bars.” One company that caters to newlyweds in Seattle and Portland specializes in setting up outdoor cannabis bars (as many venues shy away from having the substance smoked or on display inside).  Continue reading

There has been a lot of uncertainty for some Americans in recent weeks as President Donald Trump has taken office, and that has extended to the question of how the federal government will proceed with regard to legal marijuana. Especially troubling was the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions to the post of U.S. Attorney General over the Justice Department. Sessions in the past has been outspoken in his opposition to legalized marijuana, questioning the character of those who use the drug for any purpose. american

However, there is some evidence Sessions may be softening somewhat on his position, and there could be new reason to be hopeful about the Trump-era as far as legal cannabis is concerned. In a recent confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill, Sessions, although shying away from a definitive plan for how to treat states’ legalization of the drug, did concede during questioning that to disrupt the legal marijuana markets by enforcing federal cannabis laws could result in an unnecessary strain on federal resources.

Beyond this revelation came the recommendation of Jim O’Neill for the appointment to lead the U.S. Food & Drug Enforcement Administration (FDA). According to Bloomberg News, O’Neill is managing director at Mithril Capital Management and a Silicon Valley investor. He previously served as the principal associated deputy secretary at the Department of Health and Human Services. Although he doesn’t have a medical background (and the head of the FDA has been for the lats 50 years either a medical doctor or prominent scientific researcher), he is believed to be a supporter of medical marijuana. He has strong ties with billionaire Peter Thiel, a Trump transition team member who co-founded the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform.  Continue reading

Over the course of the last year, a number of states have acquiesced to allow medical marijuana to be distributed for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. army

For example:

  • The U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate voted on separate occasions to allow the Veterans Affairs office doctors to talk about medicinal marijuana with their patients as an alternative form of treatment if they suffer from PTSD.
  • In Ohio, PTSD was listed as one of the 20 conditions that qualified under the state’s medical marijuana law signed by the governor.
  • In Illinois (Cook County, to be specific), a judge ordered that the state’s department of health add PTSD as a condition that qualifies for medical marijuana.
  • In New Jersey, the state assembly passed a bill that qualified PTSD as a condition for which sufferers could obtain medical marijuana.
  • In Rhode Island, the governor signed a law listing PTSD as a condition that is debilitating for purposes of medical cannabis treatment.

In addition to all this, the results of the November election mean that 21 states plus Washington D.C. and Guam gave the green light for marijuana to be used to treat PTSD. However, not all states are on the same page about this.  Continue reading