Articles Tagged with Orange County marijuana lawyer

A U.S. Senate panel with considerable power in the federal government is pressing federal agencies to wade into the marijuana industries in ways that some might find surprising. Specifically, there is a request that federal safety testing be conducted on products made by marijuana dispensaries in states where the drug has been legalized. Such standardized marijuana testing could help customers have confidence that their products are safe. marijuana research attorney

Lack of information on the purity and potency of marijuana products distributed to U.S. consumers is of major concern, according to the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee. That’s why its members are asking that federal agencies work together to develop a standard, national testing program for Schedule I products made from marijuana.

The appropriations committee’s recent report instructed qualified scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse as well as those working with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to start work on samples of marijuana in order to give the federal government better data that could be used to provide better policy solutions to help protect consumers.  Continue reading

Black market sales of marijuana thrived under a system that totally outlawed the drug. For decades, illicit sales lined the pockets of violent drug cartels and gangs. Legalizing marijuana, as California did with Prop. 64, would effectively quash this problem, or so it was believed. After all, when marijuana is sold in highly-regulated stores, it gives the government more control, it gives taxpayers a cut and it provides safe access for patients and users. However, recent analysis shows black market sales may not be completely eliminated. marijuana license

The San Francisco Chronicle looked at this issue in weighing the makeup of the black market.

First, there is the fact the California grows more marijuana than is consumed by residents. Prop. 64 did nothing to effect the laws in other states, but interstate borders aren’t always policed to the point every person crossing from one state to the next with marijuana would be caught. Secondly, the law did not give a rubber stamp to all growers or sellers of marijuana. Sellers have to be licensed by a state agency, and they must comply with a long series of rules that detail everything from plant testing to packaging labels to tracking.  Continue reading

Even before California legalized the cultivation and sale of marijuana for recreational users, this state was already one of the country’s biggest producers of the drug in the country. Recently, The Orange County Register delved into just how big of a producer – and the results are somewhat astonishing, even to those of us familiar with the industry. field

California is known around the world to have some of the best soil for farming all types of agriculture. We grow some of the greatest grapes, winter vegetables, garlic, olives and almonds. But the biggest item produced? Cannabis.

The Register reports that not only is marijuana the most valuable crop in the nation’s No. 1 agricultural producer state, but we grow so much of it here that it blows the other goods out of the water. Reporters looked at figures from the California Department of Food and Agriculture for crops and production estimates. What they found was that estimated marijuana crop production was more than the other five leading agricultural commodities – combined.  Continue reading

New research from the University of Michigan reveals that high school and college students are far less likely to consume illegal drugs than their parents. In fact, students’ use of prescription opioids (obtained both legally and illegally) is far less than their parents’ generation. However, there is one area where youth drug use surpasses that of the baby boom generation: Marijuana. collegestudent

The Michigan study is an ongoing, four-decades-long research on the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs. In this most recent analysis of the data, we find that those who are in the 40s and 50s used drugs in their youth far more frequently than the teens and 20-somethings of today. Excluding marijuana, more than 7 in 10 individuals who are in their 50s used illicit drugs at some point in their lives. When you include marijuana, that figure spikes to 85 percent – the vast majority.

When this cohort was in college, approximately half were actively using illegal drugs. Today, about 40 percent of adults who are of college age are using illegal drugs. Continue reading

In some ways, the marijuana industry is inherently political. It’s very existence is owed in large part to the dedication and drive of avid activists who fought in the face of hard-line opposition. obamapins

But for a long time, the industry didn’t weigh in much on individual candidates because frankly, no one was seeking their support. It was seen as risky and potentially political suicide.

Today, attitudes have shifted. The majority of Californians – and now even Americans – support safe access to medical marijuana. Most people are even beginning to warm to the idea of recreational marijuana, an issue slated to be before voters once again this November. With all that, the industry has grown – as has its voice and political clout.

Recently, the Orange County Register reported California Rep. Loretta Sanchez, vying for the seat of outgoing U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer, was proud to receive a “glowing endorsement” from the legal marijuana industry. Continue reading

Most in California are ready to say “Yes” to legalization of recreational marijuana. It’s been more than 20 years since we were the first state to allow medical marijuana. But at least one group has historically sided firmly against legalization of the drug: Law enforcement.police

Today, law enforcement groups and individuals are divided.

As The Los Angeles Times reports, many in law enforcement do still staunchly oppose making the drug available for recreational use, others recognize it could be a benefit to the state. Continue reading