Articles Posted in Los Angeles Marijuana Dispensaries

Here in California, we have more than 20 years of anecdotal evidence of the ways medical marijuana can be used to treat a variety of ailments. Thanksmedical marijuana to the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, patients have been reaping the benefits of cannabis for everything from glaucoma to anxiety and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the research that would help independently establish these things has largely been stifled in the U.S., owing largely to the federal policy that classifies marijuana as a Schedule I narcotic. Meanwhile, as reported by U.S. News & World Report, Israel has become a leader in marijuana research – and one of the latest findings of Israeli researchers underscores the medicinal properties of marijuana for cancer patients.

Published in the European Journal of Internal Medicine, the study analyzes the effects of cannabis on symptoms related to cancer and cancer treatments. These include nausea, vomiting, headaches, weakness, pain, and more. According to the study, 1,046 out of 1,742 reported success in overcoming these symptoms after six months. This total did not include participants who passed away, switched cannabis providers, or did not respond to questionnaires. The study looked mostly at patients who were at an advanced stage of cancer and on average 60-years-old. These factors meant a quarter of patients died before the study was over, but even many of those patients reported having the pain of their condition eased by cannabis.

Continue reading

In the midst of tax season, the paradox of tax-paying marijuana business owners being treated like criminals takes center stage. The San Francisco marijuana businessChronicle recently described the scene as marijuana retailers brought bags of cash to tax administration offices. Some retailers reported bringing in up to $80,000 at a time.

But what other choice did they have? California has opened the door for legal recreational sales with the implementation of Proposition 64 this year, which is bringing a new wave of money-making opportunities for cannabis entrepreneurs. And where there is money-making, there are also taxes. These businesses want to pay their taxes, but without the option of processing transactions and savings in a bank like a normal business, cannabis companies end up paying taxes with cash out of bags.

As our marijuana attorneys can explain, at the heart of this issue is Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. Section 812. According to the federal government, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I narcotic under this act. A Schedule I classification means that a drug “has high potential for abuse” and has no accepted medical use in the United States. And even under medical supervision, it would not be considered safe to consume. Obviously, nothing could be further from the truth when it comes to marijuana. For more than 20 years, cannabis has been offering relief to patients in California for everything from cancer to arthritis to anxiety thanks to the Compassionate use Act of 1996. Continue reading

There are many questions that have been answered with the legalization of recreational marijuana in California.cannabis business

  • What? Proposition 64 was approved by voters and made legal adult-use marijuana.
  • Who? Residents 21 years or older.
  • When? As of Jan. 1, 2018.
  • Where? Now, that’s a trickier matter.

Firstly, the state law did not automatically go into effect everywhere. From county to county, city to city, local governments have been making decisions about whether to maintain a ban on recreational cannabis or to legalize and set up regulations. Some of the big cities, like Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego have permitted recreational sales. Some areas, like Orange County, cultivation is allowed with restrictions, but manufacturing and retail are banned. Los Angeles took a different route, allowing retail but not cultivation or manufacturing. Other counties, like San Bernadino, don’t permit any recreational cannabis activity.

Continue reading

While many Californians are finally enjoying the freedom to use recreational marijuana, some are questioning how safe their private information is recreational marijuanawhen they make a purchase. When Proposition 64 went into effect Jan. 1, adult-use marijuana became legal in the state, with local governments able to set up their own regulations or bans.  But there are currently loopholes that threaten the privacy of customers.

Assembly Bill 2402 seeks to tighten those loopholes. Assemblyman Evan Low (D-Silicon Valley) introduced the bill, which would prevent cannabis retailers from selling customer information to third parties. It would also protect customer information from employers looking to investigate employee use, according to Capital Public Radio. It mirrors similar rules that are currently in place for medical marijuana users.

Because you must be 21 or older to purchase cannabis in California, dispensaries require a valid ID to prove your age. Though it is not mandatory, some dispensaries will keep a record of the information on file. Some use this information for marketing purposes. Many also keep such records in order to monitor how much someone is purchasing in a day, according to Politifact. This could be necessary if a business needed to prove they are in compliance with state law, which caps individual recreational marijuana sales to one ounce per day. Continue reading

Adult-use cannabis became legal in California Jan. 1 with Proposition 64 going into effect. Many cities and counties however have decided to maintain a ban on marijuana, and others did not have local regulations in place in time for the official roll out of the law.marijuana business attorneys

But even after just a few weeks, the state government is already reaping big cash benefits reefer. Gov. Jerry Brown estimates $643 million in marijuana excise taxes in the first year, according to a Los Angeles Times report. Earlier projections estimated tax revenue could eventually hit $1 billion. Brown cautioned we don’t fully know every market issue that is at play, so local governments should be careful before enacting any sweeping measures.

Even as such, the lower estimates more than cover the $52 million California budgeted for 2017-2018 to establish and run the marijuana licensing system. The $643 million also does not include local sales taxes or state license fees. It costs businesses $1,000 for a license to sell cannabis. The fees are set to cover all costs associated with permits, including background checks, and resources necessary for processing and issuing. Continue reading

Three weeks after recreational cannabis sales officially became legal in California, select Los Angeles businesses were allowed to open their doors for Los Angeles recreational cannabis businesscommercial sales. While the Adult Use of Marijuana Act made recreational sales legal in the state Jan. 1, it is still up to city and county governments to decide for themselves whether they will issue a ban or set up their own guidelines and regulations. Implementation of guidelines takes time, and some cities, Los Angeles included, were not able to get them in place before the rollout at the beginning of the year.

Los Angeles City Council approved commercial marijuana sales early in December, and by mid-January about two dozen businesses in the city had been granted temporary permits. Three of those businesses had state approval secured and were able to open for business that week, according to an NBC News report. More regulations will have to be met down the road to achieve legal status permanently, the Los Angeles Department of Cannabis Regulation told NBC. Continue reading

As medical marijuana legalization is becoming law of the land in states across the country, many states are California Medical Marijuana Lawyersstruggling with best practices and how to implement the laws quickly and correctly. It often falls to state departments, local legislatures, and other agencies to sort out licensing and sales practices.

Though this process can be difficult for the government agencies in charge of such oversights, it is the citizens of the state who suffer the most when provisions are dragged out unnecessarily.

This has led to lawsuits filed by those who allege they have experienced direct pain or damages due to the way states are implementing new laws. Continue reading

It is well-known that marijuana and cannabis products can do a lot to help with the pain of many serious medical conditions.  These products have proven invaluable to cancer patients, helping them overcome the often powerful nausea and lack of appetite caused by chemotherapy.  Because marijuana returns their appetite, this in turn improves the odds of recovery, given that wasting is a common side effect of cancer treatments. Now, according to a new report from VICE, marijuana could also be invaluable to patients with HIV.marijuana attorney

A new study concludes the active ingredients in marijuana may reduce the HIV viral lode.  If true, this goes beyond helping with pain and other symptoms of the disease.

Since marijuana is still classified as a Schedule One controlled substance of the U.S. Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (USCSA), it is very difficult for researchers who get federal money to conduct any studies. Being on the highest schedule means that it does not have any valid medial use, as established by peer reviewed research, has a high potential for abuse, and is dangerous.  While there is no question that marijuana is not chemically addictive and is not dangerous, it is hard to get peer-reviewed federal studies when conducting such studies were nearly impossible. Continue reading

A recent Op-Ed from the Los Angeles Times takes a look at the future of medical marijuana in one South Los Angeles district. As the author notes, the majority of California voters who voted supported the legalization of marijuana for recreational use for adults.

cannabis Lawyer RiversideThere are a variety of reasons why people supported Proposition 64, otherwise known as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act.  Some people realize that marijuana is not dangerous and there is no reason it should be outlawed.  Other voters, do not necessarily love the idea of people smoking marijuana, but realize that it is going to happen regardless and this way we are not spending billions on a so-called war on drugs that is clearly not working. Not only was the state losing money on enforcement, the state was also losing money to the black market, as they were not able to tax marijuana. Continue reading

According to a recent news article from the Sacramento Bee, some major changes to the adult legalization of marijuana are coming, including whether you can carry marijuana in your vehicle.  This change and many others comes from a 100-page bill just signed by Governor Jerry Brown with the goal of creating a unified regulatory system to govern marijuana in California. This is part of a major change that has been a long time coming, as there was previously very little state involvement in the medical marijuana industry.

marijuana lawyerThe state wanted to change the reputation that California is the Wild West in terms of marijuana laws and business, and they moved to create an agency to regulate medical marijuana.  As this was occurring, Proposition 64 was passed by a majority of voters, making marijuana legal for recreational use as well as medicinal. Continue reading